Octagon House Museum • Hudson Wisconsin

Bank of Hudson Window

Alfred Goss

Alfred Goss

Alfred Goss, a prominent banker and businessman, came to Hudson in the late 1850s. He was an officer of the First National Bank which was organized 1863. In 1870 the Hudson Savings Bank was organized with Alfred Goss as its president. Mr. Goss also invested in the construction of downtown buildings including the Goss-Boyden block, built in 1871. This building now houses the Eckberg Lammers Law Firm, in the former bank location, and San Pedro Café occupies the space where Philo Boyden operated his drug store.

When the Hudson Savings Bank failed in the Panic of 1893, Harry L. North spearheaded its reopening as the Bank of Hudson. North served as its president until his death in 1911.

Harry North

Harry North

Harry proved to be an astute business man and community minded. After he was graduated from the University of Wisconsin in Madison where he studied law, he returned to Hudson and entered the grain business with his father. When his father Lemuel died in 1890, Harry took over the family business which he developed and expanded.

Bank of HudsonThe State Bank of Hudson was at the NW corner of Second and Walnut. It had two formidable competitors: The First National Bank of Hudson (est. 1863 on the SW corner of Second and Walnut) and The National Bank of Hudson, est. 1897, (SE corner of Second and Walnut). In 1924 a run on the bank was averted, but in early March 1933 all three banks closed. The First National Bank was the only one to survive and it reopened on March 15, 1933.

During a renovation of the historic Goss-Boyden building for the Eckberg Lammers Law Firm a historic stained glass window was unearthed. The window, with the words “Bank of Hudson” fashioned into the glass, was recently donated to the Historical Society and we are currently raising funds for the restoration and display of the window. (learn more)

The Bank of Hudson window was not the only stained glass window in downtown Hudson, at one time several other buildings had housed beautiful windows too, including Micklesen Drug Store and the First National Bank.

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